My own personal Obama story

Obama-fly_2461808bBack in 2006, ancient history now, I was working with a young man who kept telling me about this guy Obama. Now this young man is a smart guy, going to school to get his “masters’ ticket” that would eventually qualify him to be a ship’s captain. He is intelligent and well spoken and I listened to his praise of this Obama with respect and curiosity. After hearing so much about Obama, I decided to do my own research.
So, I go online and start data mining on the subject.
I didn’t find much (maybe that was the first clue?) and the little bit I did find was either unremarkable or disturbing.
His voting record while in the elected positions he had held was limited to say the least and predictable considering that his political philosophy was disturbing. It was not difficult to discern his political leanings (somewhat to the left of Mao) from his speeches and political actions. Further is was not difficult the figure out that the man was both a racist AND an elitist; not an easy thing to justify in the world of public service.
I found out that he was a “Christian” by virtue of the fact that he attended the church of then Pastor Jeremiah Alvesta Wright, Jr., and that he had converted to his form of Christianity “not because of religious zeal”: but because he realized that the church was “a powerful political influence in the black community”. The quotes are his.
Now I already knew a bit about the Reverend Wright. I remembered him as the preacher who “God damned” America after 9/11. I remembered reading one of his sermons where he expressed ideas that were anti-Semitic, anti-white, and essentially anti-Christian. Reading this sermon side by side with one given by the illustrious Lewis Farrakhan, I could see no difference in the rhetoric at all. The same hate filled rants of jealousy and resentment that plays to an audience of professional victims who resent the success and happiness of others.
These are the same people who hated Mitt Romney because he was “rich”. They forget that most of the men who have been successfully involved in the politics of the United States have been “rich”. The various politicians that they lionize; FDR, JFK and many more were FILTHY rich.
Then there was the thing about where our boy Barry was born. While I always sympathized with the birthers, I’ve always known that this was a non issue that would never be resolved because Obama supporters didn’t care where he was born.
I found that his claim to fame was having been a “grassroots community organizer”. Been there, done that; but I’ve never thought of that as a reason to aspire to the country’s highest office.
When I reviewed his public speeches I saw that the content was always self-serving and usually contradictory. I saw a man who would say anything to win an audience, a fairly good speaker, as long as he had a teleprompter.
I found it interesting that this man whose father walked out on him and his mother would lionize this bum in a memoir while never mentioning his mother. He put on the personae of a “strong black man” and somehow forgot the Nebraska white side of his heritage completely. He seemed not to remember that it was the white side of the family that took him in and supported and educated him after his mother no longer seemed to want him around her new husband and family.
His mother had taken off to Indonesia with him but subsequently sent him back to Hawaii to live with her parents. His father had long since taken off back to Kenya to live with his other wives. Although Obama made a point of explaining that his father was NOT an active follower of Islam; it sure looked like daddy Obama certainly took advantage of the Muslim philosophy regarding polygamy and had a tendency to acquire wives and drop kids where ever he went. This was the same father who pointedly avoided answering any questions about “marital status’ on any of the hundreds of papers and forms filed with INS during his residency in this country. This was the same father who was fired on the direct order of no less than Jomo Kenyetta himself for being incompetent and corrupt. No small feat considering the climate of corruption that was the Kenyetta regime.
Weighing the results of my research; I wasn’t impressed with our boy Barry. As a matter of fact I just didn’t like him.
The final piece that for me explained and exemplified what he was all about was a short piece of footage that was shot at the event where he was to announce that he was running for the Presidency. Here was this black woman warming up the crowd for the main attraction. I didn’t know who she was and I wasn’t impressed by her speech. But as she made the introduction it became clear that she must be his wife because she introduced him to the cheering crowd as “my baby daddy, Barack Obama”.
For me that said it all; we were in deep trouble.

From The Washington Post

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A democratic Egypt or a state of hate?

By Richard Cohen

Tuesday, February 1, 2011

Things are about to go from bad to worse in the Middle East. An Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement is nowhere in sight. Lebanon just became a Hezbollah state, which is to say that Iran has become an even more important regional power, and Egypt, once stable if tenuously so, has been pitched intochaos. This is the most dire prospect of them all. The dream of a democratic Egypt is sure to produce a nightmare.

Egypt’s problems are immense. It has a population it cannot support, a standard of living that is stagnant and a self-image as leader of the (Sunni) Arab world that does not, really, correspond to reality. It also lacks the civic and political institutions that are necessary for democracy. The next Egyptian government – or the one after – might well be composed of Islamists. In that case, the peace with Israel will be abrogated and the mob currently in the streets will roar its approval.

My take on all this is relentlessly gloomy. I care about Israel. I care about Egypt, too, but its survival is hardly at stake. I care about democratic values, but they are worse than useless in societies that have no tradition of tolerance or respect for minority rights. What we want for Egypt is what we have ourselves. This, though, is an identity crisis. We are not them.

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It’s impossible now to get a fix on what is happening in Egypt. The Muslim Brotherhood seems to be lying low. Is this a reflection of weakness or canniness? The Brotherhood remains the only well-organized institution in Egypt other than the military. It has been underground for generations – jailed, tortured, infiltrated, but still, somehow, flourishing. Its moment may be approaching.

Under a different name (Hamas), the Muslim Brotherhood runs the Gaza Strip. Hamas’s charter states unequivocally that it wants to eradicate Israel. It mentions the 1978 Camp David accords, and not with admiration. (“Egypt was, to a great extent, removed from the circle of the struggle through the treacherous Camp David Agreement.”) No doubt that in an Egyptian election, the call to repudiate the treaty will prove popular – as popular as the peace with Israel has not been.

The Muslim Brotherhood’s most influential thinker was the Egyptian Sayyid Qutb. He was hanged in 1966, but not before he had managed to turn out a vast amount of writings. He showed almost superhuman courage and was, in many respects, a formidable man. But he was also a racist, a bigot, a misogynist, an anti-Semite and a fervent hater of most things American. As if to prove that familiarity breeds contempt, he had spent about two years in the United States.

The Egyptian crisis has produced the usual blather about the role of America. The United States remains powerful and important, but it has already lost control of events – not that it ever really had it. Moreover, it hardly matters what Washington now says. The Islamists of the Brotherhood do not despise America for what it does but for what it is. Read Qutb’s purplish alarm at the dress and appearance of American women. Read his racist remarks about blacks. The Islamic state Qutb envisioned would be racist, anti-Semitic and anti-Christian as well. It would treat women as the Taliban now does – if only because the Taliban, too, reveres Qutb. He rejected a clemency offer, saying his words would matter more if he was dead. He was right.

Majority rule is a worthwhile idea. But so, too, are respect for minorities, freedom of religion, the equality of women and adherence to treaties, such as the one with Israel, the only democracy in the region. It’s possible that the contemporary Islamists of Egypt think differently about these matters than did Qutb. If that’s the case, then there is no cause for concern. But Hamas in the Gaza Strip, although recently moderating its message, suggests otherwise. So does Iran.

Those Americans and others who cheer the mobs in the streets of Cairo and other Egyptian cities, who clamor for more robust anti-Mubarak statements from the Obama administration, would be wise to let Washington proceed slowly. Hosni Mubarak is history. He has stayed too long, been too recalcitrant – and, for good reason, let his fear of the future ossify the present. Egypt and the entire Middle East are on the verge of convulsing. America needs to be on the right side of human rights. But it also needs to be on the right side of history. This time, the two may not be the same.